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ƿ TT(Audi TT)Ұ
: 2007.06.20 | ȸ : 7,015

Audi TT

Second generation
2007 Audi TT
Production 2007-present
Platform Volkswagen A5 platform
Engine(s) 2.0L 200 hp I4
3.2L 250 hp V6
Transmission(s) 6-speed manual
6-speed automatic
Wheelbase 97.2 in
Length 164.5 in
Width 72.5 in
Height 53.5 in
1 , ,
Length 159.1 in
Width 73.1 in
Height 53.0 in
Fuel capacity 14.5 US gal.

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2.0  200, ִũ 28.6kg.m 2,000cc ͺ ָ л TFSI 0=>100km/h ӽð 6.5ʷ 𵨺 2
ϴ.

TT ̳ 4 ϵ ˷̴ Ǿ ְ ȭϱ ʺκп ƿ Ǿϴ. FSI ߾˷ ֵ ̽ī κͿ Fuel straight/Stratified Injection Ѵ. FSI ȿ ī ݴϴ. 6 ⺻̰ DSG ɼ Ҽ ְ 3.2Ϳ 4 ž˴ϴ. ƿ Ƽ꼭 ̻ MagneRide ʸ ΰֽϴ. 

Ǹ ƿ TT 2.0 TFSI 6,250, ƿ TT ε彺 2.0 TFSI 6,520(ΰ )Դϴ.

In August 2004, Audi announced that the next-generation TT will be made of aluminum and would go into production in 2007. A TT concept (the Audi Shooting Brake) was shown at the Tokyo Motor Show in 2005. This concept featured angular styling and a "shooting brake" 2-door hatchback body style.[1]


Audi revealed the second-generation TT, internal designation Typ 8J, on April 6, 2006. It is constructed of aluminum in the front and steel in the rear to enhance its balance and is available in front- or all-wheel drive. The production car uses either the 3.2 L V6 engine, with 250 PS (184 kW), or a 200 PS (147 kW) version of Audi's direct injection 2.0 L four. Better known as FSI, Fuel Straight/Stratified Injection, the technology was derived from the LeMans racecars and offer improved fuel efficiency as well as an increased power output. A 6-speed manual transmission is standard, with the DSG as an option, and Quattro all wheel drive is standard with the V6. Audi's new active suspension, Audi Magnetic Ride, will be available and is based on Delphi's MagneRide. It will again be offered as a 2+2 coupé with a roadster arriving in late 2007 as a 2008 model. A wagon version is rumored as well.[2] The second-generation Audi TT is now available to consumers in the United States as a 2008 model.

Also for 2008, a TT-S(S for Sport) and TT-RS(RS for Renn Sport in German, or Race Sport) are in the works, similar to the S4 and RS4 versions of the Audi A4. The TT-S will use the turbocharged 2.0 liter I4 known from the Audi S3 producing 270 horsepower, and the TT-RS will use a 2.5 liter 5-cylinder engine making 350 horsepower, both intended to compete with the BMW Z4, Nissan 350Z, and Porsche Cayman S.[3] An upgraded 4-cylinder TDI is also planned with output more than the current top-of-the-line 125 kW (170 hp) model.








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First generation
First Generation TT
Production 1999–2006
Platform Volkswagen A4 platform
Engine(s) 1.8L 150hp I4
1.8L 160hp I4
1.8L 180 hp I4
1.8L 225 hp I4
3.2L 250 hp VR6
Transmission(s) 5-speed manual
6-speed manual
6-speed automatic
6-speed DSG
Wheelbase 95.4 in (FWD)
95.6 in (AWD)
Length 159.1 in
Width 73.1 in
Height 53.0 in
Fuel capacity 14.5 US gal.
Audi TT
Second Generation TT
Manufacturer Audi AG
Parent company Volkswagen Group
Production 1999–present
Assembly Győr, Hungary
Class Luxury sport car / Roadster
Body style(s) 2-door coupé
2-door roadster
Layout Front engine, front-wheel drive / four-wheel drive

Related
Audi A3
Volkswagen Golf/Rabbit
Skoda Octavia
SEAT León
Volkswagen New Beetle



The Audi TT is a sports car produced by Audi since 1998 in Győr, Hungary.

Contents

[hide]

[edit] TT concept

The TT was first shown as a concept car at the 1995 Frankfurt Motor Show. The design is credited to J Mays and Freeman Thomas of Volkswagen's California design studio, with Martin Smith contributing to the interior design. The TT name does not indicate "twin turbo" as is sometimes assumed. The car is named for the NSU TT, a small rear-engine model with a formidable racing pedigree that NSU produced in the 1960s and was based on the NSU Prinz, although the modern TT shares next to nothing with that model's design concepts. The NSU TT was, in turn, named for the famous Isle of Man TT (Tourist Trophy) motorcycle races.

[edit] TT design

The TT's styling is regarded by many as a watershed moment in automobile design. From its introduction as a concept car in 1995, and as a production car in 1998, the design was regarded by many as bold, innovative, and revolutionary. While the car borrowed a few design elements from earlier vehicles, the overall design was considered by many to be truly unique. Despite its smooth-curved appeal, the design does not lead to revolutionary aerodynamics- the drag coefficient of the body is actually a relatively high 0.35 [1]. But with its distinctive, rounded bodywork, bold use of bare anodized aluminum, and a lack of defined bumpers, the TT represented a departure from much of the styling that dominated the car market at that time.

The success and popularity of the TT's iconic design gave many automotive designers (and manufacturers) greater latitude to experiment with bold, distinctive design. The TT's influence can be seen in the design elements of many vehicles released after the TT.

The TT is often regarded as the vehicle that made people take a second look at Audi. No longer just a second-tier European maker, Audi emerged as a serious competitor for the likes of BMW and Mercedes-Benz. The then-new B5-platform A4 model was a substantial improvement on its Audi 80 predecessor; these two models firmly secured Audi's position as a prestige marque.

[edit] First generation

First generation
First Generation TT
Production 1999–2006
Platform Volkswagen A4 platform
Engine(s) 1.8L 150hp I4
1.8L 160hp I4
1.8L 180 hp I4
1.8L 225 hp I4
3.2L 250 hp VR6
Transmission(s) 5-speed manual
6-speed manual
6-speed automatic
6-speed DSG
Wheelbase 95.4 in (FWD)
95.6 in (AWD)
Length 159.1 in
Width 73.1 in
Height 53.0 in
Fuel capacity 14.5 US gal.

The production model (internal designation Typ 8N) was launched as a coupé in September 1998, followed by a roadster in August 1999, based on the Volkswagen A platform used for the Volkswagen Golf, Skoda Octavia and others. Styling wise, it differed little from the concept, except for slightly reprofiled bumpers and the addition of rear quarterlight windows behind the doors. Mechanically, the TT uses a transversely mounted engine with front or quattro all wheel drive. It was first available with a 1.8 L turbocharged inline four cylinder 20-valve engine. For the first two years of production, both front wheel drive and quattro models featured a 180 PS (132 kW) version of this engine. In 2001, a more powerful Quattro model was released which was equipped with a 225 PS (165 kW) engine which shares the same basic design but features a larger turbocharger, an additional intercooler on the driver's side, forged connecting rods, a dual exhaust, and a few other internals designed to accommodate the increase in turbo boost from roughly 10 psi peak to 15.

Audi TT Roadster
Audi TT Roadster

All TT models were recalled in late 1999/early 2000 following concerns over the car's handling which was considered unstable under high-speed cornering as the result of throttle lift-off oversteer - a number of modifications were made, which were subsequently incorporated into all future examples: rear-wing spoilers were fitted (to reduce lift) and suspension settings were altered (to increase understeer). The original four cylinder engine range was complemented with a 250 PS (184 kW) 3.2 L VR6 in early 2003, which comes with the quattro all-wheel drive system. In October 2004 a new DSG (dual-clutch) gearbox, which improves acceleration through drastically reduced shift time, was offered along with a stiffer suspension.

Audi has developed the TT with some notable improvements, including a lightened and power-boosted "quattro Sport" model, and 240 PS (176 kW) and a top speed of 250 km/h (155 mph), however the handling and steering are considered by many (including BBC's Top Gear presenter, Jeremy Clarkson), to be "boring". It compares with the Nissan 350Z which has more grip. It should be noted, however, that the TT's handling character is deliberate[citation needed], as Audi vehicles are generally designed to exhibit understeer (a characteristic determined by suspension design, the effect of the quattro all-wheel drive system, and other factors). Understeer is inherently a safer handling characteristic, as it is easier for novice and casual drivers to predict and control the vehicle (and thus the car can appeal to a much broader market). Sports car purists and driving enthusiasts, however, generally favor power oversteer (which the Nissan 350Z exhibits) to understeer, as the former makes for a more involving and spirited driving experience.

The 2006 TT model was pulled from California and other states that had adopted California emission standards because the 2006 Audi TT did not meet with these states' emissions standards. The statement on Audi of America's site (www.audiusa.com) reads: "The 2006 Audi TT models do not meet California emission standards and cannot be sold in California or in those states that have adopted California emission standards, i.e., New York, Massachusetts, Vermont or Maine. TT models from model year 2005 and earlier may be available in these states through our Certified pre-owned program. Contact your dealer for more information."

[edit] Second generation

 

[edit] Awards

The TT was nominated for the North American Car of the Year award for 2000. It was also on Car and Driver magazine's Ten Best list for 2000 and 2001.

The second generation TT has been honored with many awards including the inaugural Drive Car of the Year, Top Gear Coupe of the Year 2006, Fifth Gear Car of the Year 2006, Autobild 'Most Beautiful Car' and World Design Car of the Year 2007, as well as being a finalist for World Car of the Year.

[edit] References

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

[edit] Notes

  1. ^ TT Almost Revealed. AutoWeek. Retrieved on March 9, 2006.
  2. ^ TT Revealed - for Real. AutoWeek. Retrieved on April 7, 2006.
  3. ^ Gall, Jared; Hans G. Lehman (01). Spied: 2008 Audi TT-S (English) (Website Article) 1. Retrieved on September 30, 2006.
 
[] 2007.06.21
 
 
[] 2007.06.13